“La Senyera Catalana” – The oldest national flag in the world

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Dating from 1238, and kept in L’Arxiu Històric Municipal de València, this is the oldest national flag in the world, among those still in use. And it is the flag of my little homeland: Catalunya.

The Pennon of the Conquest (Catalan: Penó de la Conquesta) is the flag raised by the Moors of Valencia, Spain, on September 28, 1238 on the tower of Alī-Bufāt, later called Torre del Temple, to indicate their surrender to the troops of king James I of Aragon. We know about this episode from the quote entered by the king himself in his Chronicle: “We were in the riverbed, between the gardens and the tower; and when we saw our flag upon the tower, we dismounted from our horse, and heading eastwards we cried from our eyes and kissed the earth for the great mercy God had made…

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Edward McCartan (I) – The gentle eroticism

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Edward Francis McCartan (August, 1879 – September, 1947) was an American sculptor, best known for his bronzes of Art-Déco style, popular in the 1920s.
Born in Albany, New York, he studied at the Pratt Institute and at the Art Students League of New York, and then in Paris for three years before his return to the United States in 1910. In 1914, McCartan became the Director of the Sculpture Department of the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design in New York City.
Posthumously honored by the National Sculpture Society, his public monuments were few -but the Eugene Field Memorial (“Winken, Blinken, and Nod” also know as “The Dream Lady”) can still be found in the Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago.

Other works can be seen at Brookgreen Gardens, South Carolina, and the Grosse Pointe War Memorial in Michigan. New Jersey Bell Headquarters Building -a national historic site in Newark- New…

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Edward McCartan (II) – Some daring elegance

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This is a second gallery with carefully selected and adequately presented images of sculptures by Edward Francis McCartan (Albany, NY, 1879-1947), among the big lot that one may find on the Web -many of them with low resolution and wrong captions.

I will add very few comments (if any) and explanations about them in this post, since I fairly think that the works speak by themselves, and do it eloquently.

I have chosen three bronzes:

Diana and Hound, 1920, in the Chazen Museum of Art, Madison, Wisconsin:

edward-mccartan-diana-and-hound-1920-2-adjDiana and Hound (1920 – bronze – lat. left)

edward-mccartan-diana-and-hound-1920-4-adjDiana and Hound (1920 – bronze – front)


Another Diana (with another hound) of a smaller size and slightly more stylised, with slimmer and taller figures, both the woman and the dog. (This sculpture belongs to a private collection) :

Edward McCartan Tutt'Art@Diana with hound (1922 -bronze…

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A hearted apology to Wim Wenders

(Referred to the previous post about “Der Himmel über Berlin„, published yesterday, 24 December, on this blog. -Here- ) When editing and summarizing my sister’s notes about the film “Der Himmel über Berlin„, I misunderstood (in fact, missed to read) a couple of lines and attributed to the director, Wim Wenders, a harsh judgment that… Continue reading A hearted apology to Wim Wenders

For my little firefly’s sake: many thanks and some tulips to her true friends!

By Li Fontrodona Six tulips (I guess they are tulips): one for each of the six persons who have commented at least once here, on my late sis’s blog, during its ten months of existence, while she was here to look and count. She felt a bit disappointed for her scarce online success in spite… Continue reading For my little firefly’s sake: many thanks and some tulips to her true friends!